Poker Book Review

The Crew was a group of young poker players that hung out together and did quite well at the WSOP 2004, but none better than Scott Fischman who took home 2 bracelets that year and the admiration of a growing youth movement in poker. A little bit chippy, a little bit lucky, Fischman won his titles by knowing his game inside and out.

Originally a poker dealer in Vegas, Fischman learned the games by watching. Unlike other dealers who become trained mathematical autonomons, Fischman actually paid attention to who won on a regular basis. As Fischman observed, the players who were often criticized for not making the "correct play" were often the ones taking home the cash. This still wasn't enough for Fischman as his usual routine included crossing to other side of the table at shift end. Admittedly, he didn't do to well at first, but gradually became keen enough all the major poker games to play in, and win the HORSE tournament at the WSOP - certainly the most skill demanding tournament of all.

Online Ace poker book. is all about internet poker though, as Fischman and a vibrant youth movement in poker have built years of experience condensed into months of online multi-tabling. Multi-tabling is also one of Scott's sure fire recommendations in this book, as opposed to what many other authorities will teach. Fischman has a guiding theory that the way to temper, bad beats, bad luck, poor cards, and self brow beating is to simply play more games at once. This has a positive effect on your mind set, as some other table is going to require your attention in less than 2 seconds. No time for self pity, bad beat anger, or wrong play remorse. Learn. Adjust. Accept. Get on with the game because there is money to made and the fewer mistakes you commit during your play, the better you will be in the long run.

Fischman offers virtually no hand to hand combat scenarios here ala Harrington, but the theme of the book isn't a proponent of that either, spending a lot of its content digging into the psychology of poker today, and describing quite well internet strategies for multi table tournaments, ring games, bank roll management and the best section of all, sit and go tournaments. For this section alone, Scott Fischman has exceeded his publishers' expectations.